For the girls

For the girls

The Official Blog of Here for the girls

, September 09, 2019 | More Post by

Welcome to our blog series, “Mission Moment!” It’s a snapshot of the impact our mission and programs have on the women we serve. If you have any questions about Here for the Girls support services and programs, email the program team at support@hereforthegirls.org!

Every year H4TG selects 12 members (aka Boobers!) to be featured in our annual calendar and to serve as ambassadors for the organization. Part of the requirement to be a calendar model is fundraising. Each model is given a fundraising goal to be reached by the end of the calendar year. One of our most recent models elected to gift funds she raised to another calendar model. She had already reached her goal and wanted to help her fellow sister reach her goal as well. She told us that, “teamwork makes the dream work,” and that she is “here for the girls!” That’s what we are all about – we will continue to band together to live out our mission!

, September 03, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

Aug. 7: A new study found women who switched to poultry from beef, lamb or pork were 28 percent less likely to get breast tumors. It also shows those who ate the most red meat overall, had a 23 percent higher risk of the disease to those who rarely consumed it. Read the full story on the New York Post HERE.

Aug. 8: Electromagnetic fields might help prevent some breast cancers from spreading to other parts of the body, new research has found. Read the full story in Science Daily HERE.

Aug. 10: Researchers have been able to coax human breast cancer cells to turn into fat cells in a new proof-of-concept study in mice. The researchers took mice implanted with an aggressive form of human breast cancer, and treated them with both a diabetic drug called rosiglitazone and a cancer treatment called trametinib, which caused the cancer cells to change to fat cells. Read more in Science Alert HERE.

Aug. 26: A team of researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital has developed an innovative way to knock out a gene connected to triple-negative breast cancer (called Lipocalin 2) using the editing system CRISPR and has shown its potential for treating triple-negative breast tumors in mice. Read the full story in FierceBiotech HERE.

Aug. 29: A new analysis adds to the evidence that many women who take hormone therapy during menopause are more likely to develop breast cancer — and remain at higher risk of cancer for more than a decade after they stop taking the drugs. The full story is in STAT News HERE.

 

, September 03, 2019 | More Post by

44, diagnosed at 42

2nd degree family history, no known mutation

Shannon, mother of two teens, wife, and virtual assistant, had cervical cancer at age 37 and a family history of breast cancer prompting her doctor to order annual breast MRIs. Her first MRI found suspicious areas in her right breast. Testing confirmed Stage 1 breast cancer, and she opted for a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction. Shannon’s first battle with cancer was private with just her devoted husband and family for support as she detached from friends she felt couldn’t understand. With the second diagnosis, she turned outward, not inward and found a mission she calls “Reflect Ripples,” to help women through their “storms.” Attending the annual Here for the Girls retreat was “the best decision” because she uncovered the emptiness left by her first battle and found sisters to help her heal through the next. Of her character, Shannon says, “Mistress Miller and I are kindred spirits. We both are strong, resourceful women who found ways to rise above the challenge of seemingly impossible tasks – hers to spin straw into gold and mine to conquer cancer twice. I am now a better version of myself and able to spin the fear, sadness, and depression into gold – a mission of helping others, as I was helped.”

, August 09, 2019 | More Post by

Welcome to our blog series, “Mission Moment!” It’s a snapshot of the impact our mission and programs have on the women we serve. If you have any questions about Here for the Girls support services and programs, email the program team at support@hereforthegirls.org!

Do you want to know who helps make our loving support possible? Our amazing facilitators, also known as “leaders of love!” And, trust us — they’ve truly got the love! These amazing women (a few of them are pictured here at our annual facilitator training weekend) volunteer their time to lead our in-person support systems which span across four states and serve over 300 members annually. They open their arms and homes to our members and provide support through diagnosis, treatment, and beyond.

Check out what one of our members had to say about the impact of her support system:

“This group has taught me that I can face the ugly cancer beast, look it straight in the eye and say, ‘not this time cancer, you’re not taking another thing from me.’ It has taught me I’m not alone, and I am greater than the cancer beast.”

, August 02, 2019 | More Post by

As an organization that serves young women affected by breast cancer, we make sure to keep up with the latest news so we know what our women face when it comes to treatment and beyond. In this blog series, we will share the month’s news that we feel is most interesting and relevant.

July 6: Based on recent studies over the past decade, the old warnings about how breast cancer survivors should avoid the complication of lymphedema (which can cause irreversible swelling in the arm and often hardening of skin) have been dramatically relaxed. Read the full article in the Washington Post here to find out what experts are now recommending about this health issue.

July 9: Researchers found that non-Hispanic black women were more than twice as likely as white women to be diagnosed with so-called triple-negative breast cancers, while women under 40 were nearly twice as likely to be diagnosed with the aggressive cancer as those aged 50 to 64, according to the study published in Cancer. Read the complete article in Reuters here.

July 10: Using data from a person’s immune response, researchers have devised a blood test that may accurately predict the risk of breast cancer recurrence. The goal is for physicians and breast cancer patients to know the risk of the disease recurring within the next 3–5 years. Read the full article on Medical News Today here.

July 24: Following a request from the Food and Drug Administration, Allergan is recalling its textured breast implants worldwide. The move comes after 38 countries already recalled the implant because of the higher risk of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, or BIA-ALCL, a cancer of the immune system. Read more or watch a video on NBC.com here.

, August 02, 2019 | More Post by

Age 45, diagnosed at 41

No family history, No known genetic mutation

Virginia first read that she had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) on a patient portal and 20 minutes later learned from her doctor by phone that DCIS was Stage 0 breast cancer. Three weeks earlier, she’d had her first annual screening mammogram. She was asked to return for additional images and then again for a biopsy. Until her doctor’s confirmation, she had never considered breast cancer to be a possibility. After two lumpectomies without clear margins, Virginia had a mastectomy and chose to remove the unaffected breast too. She later had reconstruction. An early education professional, wife, and mother to a pre-teen daughter, Virginia said she always struggled to balance family and work commitments, often ignoring her own needs. “Cancer made me realize how important I am in my own life! If I am not making myself a priority, I can’t be the best version of myself.” Virginia considers herself confident, valiant, and independent, like Beauty. The Beast she faces are her own feelings of guilt and inadequacy, especially from the emotional and physical scars of cancer. She has learned that when she offers grace and compassion to her demanding host, herself, she discovers the value and beauty within.

, August 02, 2019 | More Post by

Welcome to our blog series, Go Beyond Pink! That’s a name we use at Here for the Girls to describe the fun-tastic fundraisers our supporters host for us (or with us)! This series is all about Go Beyond Pink — why people do it, who’s got neat ideas, and how you can participate. And of course, the point of these events is to support our mission to improve the lives of young women affected by breast cancer. To learn more about how to go “beyond pink” with us or to volunteer at any of our events, contact vicki.vawter@hereforthegirls.org.

No matter what October means to you, it’s coming fast. And like a tsunami, pink waves of ribbons in all shapes and forms will decorate the isles of stores, packaging, products, and event flyers across your communities. It’s a thing of beauty, right? Well, kinda. As a nonprofit, we relish the idea that so many people, businesses, and groups want to support our cause and the women we serve — not just in October, but the rest of the year too. We call this desire to support us “going Beyond Pink” because it’s not just about wearing the ribbon; it’s about taking action.

In our H4TG culture, we use the pink heart versus the pink ribbon because for us it IS all about the love! To us, the love our supporters show us by hosting Go Beyond Pink events means obtaining much needed funds to provide more resources for women diagnosed with breast cancer, expand our programs and retreats (at no cost to participants), better equip our facilitators who are directly engaged with these women, and (let’s be honest) pay for office space, for ink cartridges, technology needs, and so much more. If participating in the events of October by hosting a profit share, donating, or creating an event “For the Girls” is calling to your heart – let me thank you in advance! If you support us during other months of the year too, may I just say, “You Rock!” We need this support and we are most grateful.

But, what really brings a smile to my face is something else. Most certainly the money raised is crucial and the chance to see the enthusiasm at each event and make new friends is so special, but it’s also something MUCH more. It’s the opportunity — no, the honor — to make even just one woman who’s facing the challenges of a breast cancer diagnosis feel that she is not alone in this fight. It’s knowing that because of this month and our chance to get our name out there even more than normal, someone new may find a sisterhood full of women who have been there. Scars and all – skin deep or hidden inside. She will find that Here for the Girls offers a sense of hope, a place to ask questions, a network of ladies who understand, an opportunity to encourage others just by listening, or just a place to vent frustrations before heading back to work or to take care of her family.

So bring on the craziness of Pink-tober, we can handle it! We are all in this together and thanks to our supporters, donors, and friends in the communities we serve, it’s going to be a great month and we thank you from the bottom of our ‘pink’ hearts.

Vicki

Program + Community Relations Manager

, July 21, 2019 | More Post by

left to right: H4TG Executive Director Chris Schwab, Co-Founder Rene Bowditch, and Co-Founder and former Executive Director Mary Beth Gibson.

Welcome to the blog series “Thoughts From Chris,” a quarterly letter from our Executive Director, Chris Schwab. Feel free to leave your thoughts in the comments below!
I write to you today as the new Executive Director of Here for the Girls. It is an honor to continue the work that Mary Beth Gibson dedicated over the last twelve years as the organization’s first leader. My commitment is to continue the goal of providing a unique style of support based on the passion and determination developed by our co-founders, Mary Beth Gibson and Rene Bowditch. With the strong team we have and the legacy and support of our founders, I am excited about the future of the organization.
My background is in the non-profit sector; most of my career was dedicated to education where I earned an M.A. ED with a concentration on educational administration. For the last ten years, I have been with Here for the Girls and have played various roles from volunteer to Board member to Managing Director.
H4TG has made and continues to make a positive impact on the lives of young women affected by breast cancer. My vision is to grow the organization to meet the ever-changing needs of even more young breast cancer survivors while maintaining our core values and culture in a way that is scalable, supportable, and fiscally responsible.
I value the importance of a team and will work closely with our Board in developing future strategy, with our staff in carrying out our goals, and with our constituents in learning new opportunities — all of which will result in mission program excellence. It is with humility that I accept this role and I will maintain the heart of the organization based on its foundation: LOVE.

Thank You For Your Support,
Chris Schwab, Executive Director

Category: Blog

, July 21, 2019 | More Post by

Welcome to our new blog series, “Mission Moment!” It’s a snapshot of the impact our mission and programs have on the women we serve. If you have any questions about Here for the Girls support services and programs, email the program team at support@hereforthegirls.org!

We are always striving for new ways to live our mission, so the program team tried something new this year. We hosted our first-ever retreat just for women living with stage IV breast cancer, and all we can say is WOW! The event was excellent and offered our women important information and extra support, but there is one moment that continued to touch the staff long after the event was over.

While seated in an intimate garden on the water with the peaceful sounds of the harp playing in the background, our attention was immediately grabbed when the harpist began singing, “H4TG, H4TG, provides love and support for me.” The women gathered even closer than before, wrapping their arms around each other in a way that said, “I understand what you are feeling like no one else can.” The feeling our women shared in this moment is one we will keep in our minds as we continue to find new ways to offer support to our women.

If you are a woman diagnosed with breast cancer under 51 and currently living with stage IV breast cancer, we encourage you to attend next year’s “You’re in Charge” retreat! Keep an eye out for more information in 2020.

, July 12, 2019 | More Post by

Raquel, 42, diagnosed at 36

1st degree family history; BRCA1 positive

Raquel, a military wife, mother of three, and office manager, was in the process of relocating the household when she felt a lump while showering. With a family history of breast cancer (mother, grandmother), she prepared for the worst but had to wait four months to be seen and to learn she had Stage 2 breast cancer. Her husband returned from deployment to help as she underwent a bilateral mastectomy, chemo, radiation, and total hysterectomy (after learning she had inherited a mutation of the BRCA1 gene, surprisingly from her father). When her reconstruction failed, she became a member of the “flat and fabulous” club. Following her diagnosis, Raquel ventured beyond the role of devoted homemaker to discover a successful career woman waiting in the wings. She says, “I have new confidence in myself. I own my space, and I am not afraid anymore.” A Disney fanatic, Raquel was thrilled to portray her favorite character, Snow White and relates to Snow’s nature – hard working, generous, nurturing, and very optimistic – and to Snow’s ability to laugh, sing, and dance through life’s hardships. “We are not defined by our circumstance – we define our circumstance,” is the theme of Raquel’s fairy tale.